Meet an International Volunteer: Yun

The International Department would like to introduce Yun, a banker became psychologist from Korea. Yun is the new long-term volunteer at DEPDC’s Swimming Home Shelter in Mae Chan. He is a certified psychologist, swimming trainer, and Korean language teacher.

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One of my favorite authors, Paulo Coelho said that “each human being has his own personal legend to be fulfilled and this is the reason he is in the world”. I strongly believe in his words, because I spent many years for finding my personal legend and realizing the meaning of my life, which I found when I met the children in the Mae Chan Swimming Home shelter. I am Yun Kwansub from South Korea. Only about a decade ago, I was an ordinary banker who had quite good salary and higher position in my work. Although I was satisfied with my life, I felt the emptiness of life somehow. After I broke up with my girlfriend, the feeling of emptiness was immense. I could not do anything else at that time. My life was getting boring, tedious and routine like a mouse in a wheel. Nothing was interesting to me. Another author, Mark Twain stressed about the life and said, “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” So I threw off my bowlines and sailed around the world in order to find the meaning of my life. Most of surrounding people including my family, colleagues, and acquaintances persuaded me to rethink my decision, but they could not stop me. Because I knew that is not my life at all. While I was travelling around the world, I met many different types of people whom I have never met before. They taught me how to have a flexible mindset, a different point of view to see the world from, and how to live their happy life. Through this long journey, I could find what I wanted to do and what my personal goal is. I was eager to be someone who is beneficial to the world.

I think that we have to act before we are ready sometimes. Although I have not built perfect careers to work at NGO, I am mentally ready to do it. So I decided to engage with activist NGOs instead of progressing to a master’s degree or a doctorate after I completed my bachelor’s degree in psychology. I researched many NGOs in the world for a month, only DEPDC in Thailand caught my eye. DEPDC has been in business for more than 25 years in order to prevent and to protect children and youths from being trafficked into exploitative labor conditions by providing proper education, vocational and life-skills training, and accommodation. This NGO’s achievements are remarkable. To change children’s life as well as shift the paradigm of local society is very impressive. I was sure that organization would help me to achieve my dream and learn many things from staff in DEPDC. Hence, I decided to apply to be a volunteer in DEPDC without any hesitation.

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After several long and boring days for the approval of my volunteer visa, I arrived in Chiang Rai, Thailand on 31, May in the end. I had been here once with my mother while travelling, but my attitude and mind are so different from that time. I have a stronger sense of responsibility and feel some pressure to do things well. While I was learning Thai language for a month at Chiang Rai Rajabhat University, I learned about basic Thai language, Thai culture and some political issues about the relationship between Myanmar and Thailand including migration, human trafficking, recent crime around the border region and, especially, the political issues between Myanmar and Thailand are too complicate to solve them instantly and simply. After know those issues. I highly respect and admire Khun Sompop who has dedicated the last 26 years of his life to migrated children from Myanmar to prevent human trafficking and sexual abuse. On 3 July, I came to the Mae Chan Swimming Home shelter with more concern than expectation. I was worried and stressed that I would not measure up to the task and fall short of expectations, but I recognized that these were all just unfounded concerns as soon as I met the children. When I saw their innocent faces, I felt that this is my work. What I have to and I will be able to my best for them. I am currently writing a blog post to provide news in the shelter to promote new potential cooperation and individual donations. During the day, the children go to school. When they return, I teach the children to swim and to play a music instrument, the ocarina. These activities encourage children to have a healthy level of physical and social activity and promote an active lifestyle all year long. Also, they would be able to improve their overall mood, and combat depression, anxiety and stress they have.

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I have never forgotten Khun Sompop’s words on the first day. He told me that we are like a farmer, planting seeds in the ground. Carefully and patiently nurture them, then the seeds will grow up and become a big tree naturally. Every child is an amazing seed turning into a big tree with beautiful flowers and juicy fruits. Our duty is parenting them, caring for them and observing them with strong feelings of affection and concern. As like his words, I want to be a volunteer to inspire and help my children to promote their life. For achieving the goal, I teach my children with modesty, patience and affection as a good farmer.

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Posted on July 29, 2016, in Mekong Regional Indigenous Child Rights Home, MRICRH, Volunteers and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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